Australia

Rescue mission returns seven whales to ocean at Hamelin Bay

Rescue mission returns seven whales to ocean at Hamelin Bay

  • Earthmoving equipment was brought into the remote location to assist with the removal of the deceased whales. Photo: Peter Stonehouse

  • Earthmoving equipment was brought into the remote location to assist with the removal of the deceased whales. Photo: Peter Stonehouse

    Earthmoving equipment was brought into the remote location to assist with the removal of the deceased whales. Photo: Peter Stonehouse

  • The rescue mission at Hamelin Bay involved local trained volunteers and officials. Photo: Shannon Stent Photography

    The rescue mission at Hamelin Bay involved local trained volunteers and officials. Photo: Shannon Stent Photography

  • The rescue mission at Hamelin Bay involved local trained volunteers and officials. Photo: Shannon Stent Photography

    The rescue mission at Hamelin Bay involved local trained volunteers and officials. Photo: Shannon Stent Photography

  • The rescue mission at Hamelin Bay involved local trained volunteers and officials. Photo: Shannon Stent Photography

    The rescue mission at Hamelin Bay involved local trained volunteers and officials. Photo: Shannon Stent Photography

  • Photos from Leaarne Hollowood.

    Photos from Leaarne Hollowood.

  • Photos from Leaarne Hollowood.

    Photos from Leaarne Hollowood.

  • Photos from Leaarne Hollowood.

    Photos from Leaarne Hollowood.

  • Photos from Leaarne Hollowood.

    Photos from Leaarne Hollowood.

  • Over 150 pilot whales were stranded at Hamelin Bay on Friday March 23, 2018. Photo: Department of Parks and Wildlife.

    Over 150 pilot whales were stranded at Hamelin Bay on Friday March 23, 2018. Photo: Department of Parks and Wildlife.

The Department of Fisheries confirmed on Friday night that just seven of the stranded whales at Hamelin Bay were able to be returned to the water after a mass beaching.

The pilot whales were discovered on the shores near Augusta at around 6am Friday morning and authorities moved quickly to cover and assess the surviving whales.

Support and equipment was rushed to the scene, with the hot sun and Hamelin’s rocky coastline proving a critical threat to the survival of the remaining whales.

At around midday on Friday just 15 of the whales were alive, and by sunset only seven were able to be returned to the water by a team of trained volunteers, veterinarians and DPAW and Sea Search & Rescue officers.

Parks and Wildlife Service Incident Controller Jeremy Chick said moving the surviving whales proved logistically difficult due to the rocky beach terrain, the location of dead whales surrounding the live whales and rough seas.

A shark warning remains in place for the region’s waters with a number of the deceased whales bearing large bite marks to suggest potential shark activity around the incident.

What to do:

Take additional caution in the Hamelin Bay area.

Adhere to beach closures advised by Local Government Rangers or Surf Life Saving WA.

Keep informed of the latest detection and sighting information by checking the SharkSmart website or Surf Life Saving WA’s Twitter feed.

If you see a shark, report it to Water Police on 9442 8600. All shark sighting information reported to Water Police is provided to response agencies and to the public on the SharkSmart website and the Surf Life Saving WA Twitter feed.

Extra information:

Keep informed of the latest detection and sighting information by checking the Shark Activity Map on the SharkSmart website – www.sharksmart.com.au/shark-activity or the Surf Life Saving WA Twitter –twitter.com/SLSWA.

Check www.sharksmart.com.au/news for current alerts and warnings.

[contf]
[contfnew]

Margaret River Mail

[contfnewc]
[contfnewc]

Related Articles

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Back to top button